And now, no word from our sponsors

first_img The decision made by Svenska Spel to halt its online TV advertising for the rest of this year has ramifications way beyond the borders of the former monopoly’s home country, says Scott Longley.As has been found previously in other newly regulated markets across Europe, the most obvious route for operators to announce their presence has been via the medium of TV ads.Yet this rush to establish a brand presence has a side effect. The ad breaks get swamped with gambling promotions and sections of the viewing public, with or without the help of lobby groups and politicians, kick up a fuss.The only surprise, perhaps, is that this cycle of events appears to be occurring very early in the short life of the regulated Swedish market.It is less than four months since the market opened up and already we have seen a survey suggesting nearly 90% of Swedes believe there is too much gambling advertising.Two Swedish trade bodies have also waded into the debate, with recommendations for new self-imposed guidelines. These consisted of a nine-point plan for how operators can advertise responsibly but didn’t include any limits on either how many ads a firm might place or when. The public statement issued by Svenska Spel chief executive Patrik Hofbauer said the company was “taking the plunge” to end its campaign on TV, citing evidence from Sweden’s Public Health Agency report, which suggested those who have problem gambling issues are “triggered” by TV advertising.This isn’t really surprising. Hofbauer suggested that the company had had “intense internal discussions”, but the evidence that gambling advertising can act as a trigger has been around for some time.Much as with the decision to advertise in the first place, it might be said the move to call a halt for this year is likely a commercial decision as much as anything. Arguably, by going public on the issue it draws attention to its stance and looks like an attempt to gain the higher ground.If it looks like a business tactic, that’s likely because it is. Should even more opprobrium be heaped on the gambling sector in Sweden due to its overexposure on TV, then Svenska Spel will be able to dodge the brickbats having already established a substantial market share.But what of the rest of the industry? Hofbauer will have raised hackles in calling for other operators to join its self-imposed ban and by suggesting that only then will the gaming industry show that it “takes consumer protection seriously”.As Svenska Spel itself admitted in its press release, “there seems to be no general link between gambling advertising and a gambling problem”, and to suggest somehow that the ending of all online casino advertising is some kind of proof of corporate responsibility is, arguably, in itself irresponsible.Without proof, such a move becomes merely a gimmick and arguably does nothing to resolve actual problem gambling issues.Quality control Similar arguments about volumes of gambling advertising are being played out in the UK, where the added complaint about advertising being seen by children is being thrown in for good measure.As it stands, the evidence that gambling advertising has an affect on children simply isn’t there. More pointedly, data from the ASA for 2017 showed that children saw 40% fewer gambling ads in 2017 than they did four years previously.With operators in the UK having agreed a whistle-to-whistle ban that begins later this year, the focus should move on from issues of quantity to one of quality. This is broadly where the ASA is at in the UK, attempting to discriminate around the how of advertising rather than the why.It is a hard area to assess. As the recent debate around a decision against Sky Bet demonstrated, defining how an ad has breached the code can be contentious.But the industry should certainly have the wherewithal to weed out simply bad advertising. As one source put it, while it might be said that Paddy Power sometimes aims low with a sub-Loaded strain of humour, others appear to take that as the cue to aim lower.If the advertising was less painful to watch, perhaps, then the complaints might be less forthcoming and the pressure would ease off. And at least we might be saved the sight of Kris Akabusi on our TV screens. Sometimes it’s all about small mercies. Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Topics: Casino & games Marketing & affiliates Sports betting Casino & games The decision made by Svenska Spel to halt its online TV advertising for the rest of this year has ramifications way beyond the borders of Sweden, says Scott Longley Regions: Europe UK & Ireland Nordics Sweden 16th April 2019 | By Joanne Christie Tags: Online Gambling And now, no word from our sponsors AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Email Addresslast_img read more

Kambi to power William Hill’s Swedish sportsbook

first_img Regions: Europe Nordics Sweden Sports betting services provider Kambi Group has agreed a deal to supply its sportsbook platform to William Hill in the regulated Swedish market.The bookmaker is licensed in Sweden via Evoke Gaming, having taken charge of the business through its acquisition of MRG Group.Evoke Gaming’s Redbet.se site is to be rebranded as WilliamHill.se as part of the operator’s efforts to establish its own brand in the country.Kambi will now align its sportsbook with William Hill’s own offering, with plans to roll out the new-look, Swedish-facing sports betting service imminently.Evoke Gaming operates as a subsidiary of MRG, for which William Hill tabled an offer of SEK2.82bn (£229.7m/€265.8m/$296.7m) in October last year.William Hill is yet to complete the deal, but in February increased its stake in MRG to 98.5%, leaving it just short of full ownership. The bookmaker has already secured all necessary regulatory approvals for the full acquisition of the operator.Image: Max Pixel Topics: Sports betting Tech & innovation Kambi to power William Hill’s Swedish sportsbook Tags: Online Gambling Sports betting services provider Kambi Group has agreed a deal to supply its sportsbook platform to William Hill in the regulated Swedish market. The bookmaker is in the process of establishing its brand in the country having rebranded Evoke Gaming’s RedBet.se site as WilliamHill.se. 29th April 2019 | By contenteditor Sports betting Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Email Addresslast_img read more

Kenya moves to overhaul gambling laws

first_img The Kenyan National Assembly is considering a bill that would revamp the country’s regulatory framework for gambling, imposing significantly higher costs on licensed operators and establishing the country’s first national lottery. Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter The Kenyan National Assembly is considering a bill that would revamp the country’s regulatory framework for gambling, imposing significantly higher costs on licensed operators and establishing the country’s first national lottery.The Gaming Bill 2019, designed to replace the 1966 Betting, Lotteries and Gaming Act, aims to update the country’s regulations to reflect the prominence of online operators in the market.It proposes replacing the country’s existing regulatory authority, the Betting and Licensing Control Board, with a new entity, the National Gaming Authority. This would take charge of enforcing regulations and issuing licences.As well as establishing a new regulatory authority, the bill also looks to establish the Gaming Appeals Tribunal, a body that would adjudicate in gambling-related disputes.Foreign operators will be required to establish a physical presence and base servers in the country.The bill imposes significantly higher costs on prospective licensees, with iGaming operators to be charged KES100m (£776,643/€876,787/$985,667) for a three-year licence, followed by a KES30m renewal fee. Casinos and gaming halls, meanwhile, will be charged a KES50m licence fee, then must pay KES30m to have their licence renewed. Land-based bookmakers’ licence fees have been set at KES30m, followed by a KES5m renewal charge, again after three years.Currently operators are charged KES1m to apply for a licence from the Betting and Licensing Control Board, then a KES3m licence fee, and KES25,000 to renew a permit. For bookmakers, a KES10,000 application fee is followed by a KES200,000 charge for an on- or off-course licence – or KES400,000 for both.However, the bill does not look to raise the country’s gambling tax rate, following a tumultuous 2018 that saw gambling taxes raised to 35%, then reduced to 15%. The 15% tax rate has been retained, though the legislation makes no mention of the 20% tax imposed on player winnings in September last year.With growing concern about Kenyans developing problem gambling habits, the bill looks to set a minimum bet amount of KES50. This is half the minimum sum of KES100 set by SportPesa, one of the leading local operators, but significantly higher than the amounts smaller operators in the market are willing to accept. Advertising, another contentious issue, will also be subject to stricter controls. All TV and radio ads to dedicate at least 10% of their air time to responsible gaming messaging, with gambling ads prohibited from airing between 6am and 10pm, unless during live sports broadcasts.There is also a bid to limit how many ads are broadcast by introducing the Gaming Advertisement Tax. This imposes a charge of 35% on each ad broadcast, though it is unclear whether the tax would be imposed on the operator or the broadcaster, and on what sum the 35% tax would be levied.Kenya could also see its first national lottery established should the bill pass into law. The lottery’s operator would be decided through a tender process, with the successful bidder granted a seven-year operating licence.The lottery would be used to raise money for sports-related good causes, which would be allocated 15% of all revenue generated. Lottery winners can expect to receive 45% of all revenue, with a further 20% to be used to meet the lottery’s administrative costs, and the final 20% to be distributed to the lottery’s agents and retailers.Money raised for good causes through the lottery would be distributed by the National Lottery Trust Fund, also established through the Gaming Bill 2019.The bill is due to be debated by the National Assembly later this week. 4th June 2019 | By contenteditor Email Address Tags: Mobile Online Gambling Casino & games AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Topics: Casino & games Legal & compliance Lottery Sports betting Regions: Africa East Africa Kenya Kenya moves to overhaul gambling lawslast_img read more

GC to review on-course bookmaker licences after underage betting

first_img30th July 2019 | By contenteditor Horse racing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter The GB Gambling Commission is to review seven on-course bookmakers’ licences after it was revealed that a number allowed minors to place a bet during the prestigious Royal Ascot horseracing event.  GC to review on-course bookmaker licences after underage betting The GB Gambling Commission is to review seven on-course bookmakers’ licences after it was revealed that a number allowed minors to place a bet during the prestigious Royal Ascot horseracing event.Last month police officers from the Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead, supported by the Commission and Trading Standards, carried out age verification purchasing tests during the event, which ran from 18 to 22 June.The investigation revealed that of the 17 on-course operators tested, seven permitted a 16 year-old to place a £5 bet in-person, in breach of the 18+ age restriction on betting. The Commission did not reveal the identity of the bookmakers involved, though it did confirm that the seven will face disciplinary action.“These licence reviews show how strongly we feel about underage gambling,” GC executive director Richard Watson said. “Every single gambling business must protect children from gambling but the on-course bookmakers results have remained unacceptable.”Watson also said the on-course sector had a history of failing age verification exercises, with an average pass rate of just 35% over the past four years.“Despite various educational attempts to raise standards, by ourselves and the trade bodies, the on-course sector has historically performed poorly in both underage gambling test purchase exercises and Think 21 testing,” he said. “Pass rates have failed to meet the standards expected and the sector has consistently performed to levels below those we see in other gambling and age restricted products.“We welcome the positive initiate by the local authority and the racecourse to raise standards in the gambling industry.”Cllr David Cannon, lead member for Public Protection at the Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead, added: “I am delighted that our officers led and organised this test purchasing. It is important that our residents, as well as visitors to the borough, are kept safe. It is not acceptable to take bets from young people and I am pleased that strong action is taking place.“Our hard working team of officers will often carry out test purchasing across the borough to ensure our residents are kept safe and that traders are abiding by the rules.”Image: Dunphasizer Regions: UK & Ireland Tags: Race Track and Racino Topics: Legal & compliance Sports betting Horse racing Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Email Addresslast_img read more

Italy iGaming Dashboard: January 2020

first_img28th January 2020 | By Stephen Carter Casino & games AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter December saw Italy’s dot.it market shrug off the country’s gambling advertising ban to end 2019 on a high, setting new monthly revenue records for igaming, sports betting, casino and bingo Tags: Card Rooms and Poker Online Gambling Slot Machines Topics: Casino & games Finance Sports betting Poker Slots Italy iGaming Dashboard: January 2020 Italy’s dot.it market shrugged off the country’s gambling advertising ban to end 2019 on a high, setting new monthly revenue records for igaming, sports betting, casino and bingo in December.Italian-licensed operators generated €192.91m in GGR across all products in the final month of the year and decade, up 44.4% year-on-year and 31.9% month-on-month, driven by a €91.17m return from sports betting and €85.14m from casino and slots. The sports betting total represented a 93.8% month-on-month increase and a 52.3% uplift on the prior month. Bet365 retained its market share lead, albeit marginally down on its November total, with 13.6%.While the market as a whole showed no obvious ill effects of the national ban on gambling advertising which came into full force from July 2019, Ficom’s Christian Tirabassi told iGB that there had been an impact on operators, “especially the pure online ones where they have registered a general 20% loss of market share in the online betting market”.In slots and casino, up 20.9% year on year and 19.2% month-on-month, PokerStars retained its market share lead with 10.02%, as it did in poker tournaments, with 57.8% of the €7m generated across the month, and 41.2% of the €5.52m of ring game revenues.The share of revenues generated by online casinos other than those operated by the top 15 largest operators however grew to 22.3% from 12.9% the prior month, indicating some fragmentation of market share away from the leading operators but too early to confirm a sustained trend in this direction.Scroll down to see the full interactive datasets.All data and figures are processed by leading European corporate advisory firm Ficom Leisure, a specialist in all segments of the betting and gaming sector. Ficom Leisure also provides monthly figures on the New Jersey online market in the New Jersey iGaming Dashboard and Pennsylvania in the Pennsylvania iGaming Dashboard, which are available on iGB North America. It also provides quarterly figures on the Spanish online market in the Spain iGaming Dashboard, on the Danish market in the Denmark iGaming Dashboard, and on the Portuguese market in the Portugal iGaming Dashboard.Photo by Davi Pimentel from Pexels Regions: Europe Southern Europe Italy Email Addresslast_img read more

Danske Spil makes 229 millionaires in 2019

first_img Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Denmark’s state-controlled gaming operator Danske Spil has announced that a record number of customers became millionaires by playing its games in 2019.Some 229 Danish players became millionaires over the past year, the majority of which were through Danske Spil’s Lotto product, with 154 customers winning major prizes – the highest number of winners in a single year.A total of 104 players won the Millionaire Guarantee, where two players every week can win DKK1m (£113,209/€133,817/$147,497) each without having to match any numbers in the main draw.Danske Spil noted that the two biggest Lotto winners were in Copenhagen, both winning in excess of DKK20m.Meanwhile, 30 people won the Eurojackpot, while four people scooped the main prize in the VikingLotto and three people won big with the Joker game.Elsewhere, nine people became millionaires by playing keno, while 16 players won major prizes on Danske Spil’s various scratchcard games.In terms of Danke Spil’s Tips sports betting offering, 13 people won more than DKK1m on individual bets. One player scooped DKK1.9m in winnings from a DKK480 wager on horse racing. Last September, Danske Spil reported year-on-year drop in gross gaming income in the first half of the year, primarily due to its decision to divest its stake in games development studio CEGO.Gross gaming revenue for the six months to 30 June, 2019 totalled DKK2.49bn, down from DKK2.54m in the same period last year.Rising costs also the operator’s profit decline, with profit before tax down from DKK1.16bn to DKK1.05bn, while net profit fell from DKK928.0m to DKK872.8m. Danske Spil makes 229 millionaires in 2019 Denmark’s state-controlled gaming operator Danske Spil has announced that a record number of customers became millionaires by playing its games in 2019. Email Address Regions: Europe Nordics Denmarkcenter_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Topics: Finance Lottery Sports betting 28th January 2020 | By contenteditor Financelast_img read more

BGC to step up RG messaging after DCMS intervention

first_img Tags: Mobile Online Gambling Email Address Legal & compliance Gaming industry standards body the Betting and Gaming Council (BGC) has committed to having its members make safer gambling messaging more prominent in advertising, following calls from the government’s Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS).Minister for sport, tourism and heritage Nigel Huddleston wrote to the UK’s five leading operators and the BGC, asking for operators to provide player data to allow DCMS to track changes in player behaviour. He also told operators to give safer gambling messaging greater prominence in their promotional material.Much of what Huddleston demanded appeared to have already been included in the BGC’s ten-point plan for protecting players during the novel coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic. However its chief executive Michael Dugher (pictured) said it would immediately work with members to examine how to give these warnings and advice greater prominence.Dugher added that it was also looking to ensure the members were able to provide the internal data on players’ gambling habits as a matter of urgency. Operators would also expedite agreed changes to VIPs, advertising technology and game design that were agreed by working groups established by the Gambling Commission.This has already seen players aged 25 and under blocked from VIP schemes, while age-gating advertising technology would also be deployed to stop this demographic being exposed to industry advertising.“We strongly welcome the proactive approach taken by you on this matter,” Dugher said in his reponse to Huddleston. “I know from our previous conversations just how seriously the government takes this issue and you have been steadfast in reminding the industry of the high standards you rightly expect and demand.”“I can give you 100% assurance that despite the severe financial pressures the industry is under at present, our members in the regulated sector are fully committed to working with you and the Government to address all concerns on safeguarding customers.”The BGC CEO told Huddleston there had been a significant drop in total gambling, with no live sports and all betting shops, bingo halls and casinos closed, but the industry was already stepping up efforts to protect online customers.However, he also pointed out that the BGC represents betting shops, igaming, bingo and casino operators only, and warned that there was a wider industry that would have to be monitored during the pandemic.“We don’t represent the National Lottery, which represents a huge amount of gambling in the UK, nor do we represent large society lotteries and arcades, so we cannot therefore speak on their behalf,” he said. “Further the BGC does not represent any unlicensed, unregulated offshore operators that exist online via the black-market that may be targeting UK customers.“I am sure, though, that the government is committed to tackling the issue of problem gambling wherever it occurs, without fear of favour.”The news comes after the Parliamentary All Party Betting & Gaming Group (APBGG) launched a review of the 2005 Gambling Act, ahead of a government-led review expected to begin later this year. The group, which is largely supportive of the industry, aims to assess four key topics: A public health approach to gambling; gambling’s relationship with football; gambling marketing, and whether the 2005 Act is fit for purpose. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter BGC to step up RG messaging after DCMS intervention 22nd April 2020 | By contenteditor Regions: UK & Ireland Gaming industry standards body the Betting and Gaming Council (BGC) has committed to having its members make safer gambling messaging more prominent in advertising, following calls from the government’s Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS). Topics: Legal & compliance Peoplelast_img read more

MGM Resorts reveals safe reopening plans for US casinos

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter MGM Resorts reveals safe reopening plans for US casinos Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Email Address MGM Resorts has set out a new strategy for safely reopening its casinos, having been forced to close venues in March due to novel coronavirus (Covid-19).The operator has devised a seven-point safety plan, based on advice from medical and scientific experts, to deter the spread of the virus, protect customers and staff, and respond to potential new cases.“Preparing for the moment we can re-open our doors, MGM Resorts focused on developing a plan that puts health and safety at the centre of everything we do,” MGM Resorts acting chief executive and president Bill Hornbuckle explained.“Our seven-point safety plan is the result of months of consultations with public health experts and outlines our comprehensive approach to welcoming guests back safely.”First, MGM has committed to a wide-reaching screening program, whereby it will carry out checks on employees to establish whether they are showing any signs of coronavirus before permitting them to enter the building. Guests will also be subject to similar checks on arrival at MGM locations.Read the full story on iGB North America. Casino & gamescenter_img MGM Resorts has set out a new strategy for safely reopening its casinos, having been forced to close venues in March due to novel coronavirus (Covid-19). Topics: Casino & games Strategy Regions: US 13th May 2020 | By contenteditorlast_img read more

New report highlights risk of money laundering in Lithuania

first_img Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Email Address Topics: Casino & games Legal & compliance Lottery Sports betting Slots AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Lithuania’s land-based casino industry faces a “very high” risk from money laundering, while the remote gambling sector faces a high risk, according to a risk assessment carried out by the country’s government. Casino & games Lithuania’s land-based casino industry faces a “very high” risk from money laundering, while the remote gambling sector faces a high risk, according to a risk assessment carried out by the country’s government.Risk levels for each aspect of Lithuania’s gambling industry were determined through “data from a variety of international and national sources”, international studies and reports and statistics provided by a sample of gambling businesses. The country’s Financial Intelligence Unit, supported by supervisory and law enforcement authorities, also contributed to the study.According to the report, the risk of money laundering for casinos, defined as the “attractiveness and ability of criminals to exploit a specific medium to launder criminally obtained property” was rated as the maximum 4 on the report’s 1-4 scale.“The casino sector is exposed to risk because the activity is based on a significant number of cash flows, which is attractive for organized crime groups, PEPs [politically exposed persons] and those coming from high-risk countries to launder money,” the report explained. “The Modus operandi is easy to implement as it requires basic planning and basic knowledge of how gambling systems work.”The risk level for slot machine parlours, betting and online gambling were all rated as a 3, indicating a high risk.“The online gambling industry is attractive for ML due to the high volume and fast execution of transactions (including cross-border transactions) as well as low identification requirements, which allows criminals to easily convert illegal funds into legitimate gambling earnings,” the report concluded.For lotteries, the risk was rated as 2, indicating a medium risk.The report also rated the vulnerability of each medium to money laundering, based on the “totality and effectiveness of measures aimed at preventing the realization of a money laundering risk, taking into account the scale and perception of the risk”. Once again this used a 1-4 scale, with a 4 indicating the most vulnerable.For land-based casinos, betting and slot parlours, this was rated as a 3 for high vulnerability.“Casinos allow only cash operations and do not verify the source of funds,” the government said said. “In addition, the sector has difficulties in performing customer due diligence (there is no evidence that all casinos would employ systems to identify related transactions of players), sanction checks and PEP identification.“Also, some casinos have customers from sanctioned or high-risk countries, such as Iran and Syria. However, casinos are the most aware of money laundering risks in comparison with other gambling sectors.”The report added that the country’s Gambling Supervisory Authority was ill-equipped to deal with the threat of money laundering in casinos.“The number of investigations carried out by supervisory authorities during 2016-2018 is insufficient and not proportional to the risk of the sector. This might be caused by the lack of human resources of the supervisory authority, which has only three employees dedicating only 15% of their time for [money laundering and terrorist financing] supervision within the sector.”The report suggested allowing casinos, slot parlours and betting to use debit cards for more easily traced transactions, setting limits on cash deposits, the usage of player cards to track each player’s gambling activity and “secret shopper” style inspections from the Supervisory Authority.Remote gambling and lotteries were both rated a 2 for medium vulnerability, though the report noted that some online operators have stricter anti-money laundering requirements than others.The report marked the second time Lithuania had completed a National Money Laundering and Terrorist Financing Risk Assessment, with a previous iteration in 2015. Tags: Mobile Online Gambling Payments Slot Machines Regions: Europe Baltics Lithuania New report highlights risk of money laundering in Lithuania 28th May 2020 | By Daniel O’Boylelast_img read more

Casumo to complete acquisition of CasinoSecret

first_img Mobile operator Casumo is to purchase online casino business CasinoSecret for an undisclosed sum, the first acquisition in the company’s history.Founded in 2018 and licensed by the Malta Gaming Authority, CasinoSecret looks to use player experience as a unique selling point, including a cashback feature that rewards players for continued play and no play-through conditions attached to offers.Casumo, which first acquired a 40% stake in the business in late 2019, said the outright acquisition would bring in more product and marketing expertise to grow its existing brands, especially around player retention.“We have developed an ambitious and exciting collaboration with the team at CasinoSecret, which made the merger a clear next step from all perspectives,” Casumo chief executive Shelly Suter-Hadad explained.“The acquisition will enable us to further leverage the strong synergies and shared direction of both businesses, while taking our group portfolio to the next level.”CasinoSecret chief executive Nadir Ounissi added that the brand’s effort to offer the best online casino experience for customers fit with Casumo’s approach.“Together we now open new doors to shared expertise and exciting opportunities across the brands,” he added.The deal comes after Casumo this year began to diversify its product offering with the launch of a Kambi-powered sportsbook in the British market.This followed a sponsorship deal with English Football League Championship club Reading FC, complementing an existing partnership between its Dunder online casino brand and Bristol City. Casino & games AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Tags: Mobile Online Gambling Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter 17th August 2020 | By contenteditor Casumo to complete acquisition of CasinoSecret Email Address Regions: Europe Topics: Casino & games Strategy Mobile operator Casumo is to purchase online casino business CasinoSecret for an undisclosed sum, the first acquisition in the company’s history.last_img read more