New Book Tells The Story Of Developing An Artificial Heart

first_img X 00:00 /08:45 To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: In a story she says is “as much about innovation as it is about medicine,” Texas Monthly executive editor Mimi Swartz has a new book called Ticker: The Quest to Create an Artificial Heart.In it, she follows a nearly 50-year saga of research and roadblocks, focused on the work of Dr. O.H. “Bud” Frazier from the Texas Heart Institute as he strives to develop a fully-functioning artificial heart with the help of various associates, a project that is still ongoing though hopefully nearing some kind of completion soon.We talk with Swartz about the book and why this story piqued her interest.center_img Terry Vine/Texas Heart InstituteDr. Bud Frazier holds up an artificial heart. Listen Sharelast_img read more

Cong spared Reliance SEZ of Rs 50cr fine Haryana Min

first_imgAs Opposition leaders raised the Reliance SEZ issue in the Assembly on Tuesday, State Finance and Industries Minister Abhimanyu said the then state government had entered into a MoU with Reliance Industries in 2005 to set up the Special Economic Zone in the Gurgaon-Jhajjar region.“A MoU was signed between HSIIDC and Reliance Ventures Limited on December 12, 2005. Based on the decision of the Haryana Cabinet, HSIIDC signed a Joint Venture Agreement (JVA) with Reliance Ventures Limited on June 19, 2006, for setting up a multi product SEZ over an area of 25,000 acres in Gurgaon-Jhajjar. Also Read – Need to understand why law graduate’s natural choice is not legal profession: CJI“However, it was later decided to shelve the SEZ project and JVA was terminated on August 29, 2014,” Abhimanyu said, while adding that the previous Congress government had promised “lakhs of jobs” and huge investment in the state from the project. To questions raised by some independent and INLD MLAs, Abhimanyu informed the House that “no tender/competitive bidding process was followed in firming up the project, but a MoU was signed between the two parties….” The minister further stated that many decisions regarding the Reliance SEZ project were taken by the Council of Ministers of the previous Congress government and some even outside the knowledge of the State Cabinet. He also said that Reliance Industries had returned nearly 1,384 acres of land in Gurgaon that was acquired for its SEZ. Also Read – Health remains key challenge in India’s development: KovindRHSL had last year returned 1,383.68 acres of land in Gurgaon acquired from HSIIDC for setting up SEZs. Responding to a question raised by an INLD MLA, the Minister said that a penalty of approximately Rs 50 crore could have been slapped by the previous Congress government on the company, but it chose not to do so. RHSL, was a joint venture between Reliance Ventures Ltd (RVL), RIL’s wholly-owned subsidiary, and government of Haryana through HSIIDC. The JV was established for development of SEZs/Model Economic Township (MET) project and other infrastructure facilities in Haryana.last_img read more

Are SelfDriving Cars Finally Ready for Consumers What Entrepreneurs Need to Know

first_img Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Register Now » Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global January 12, 2017 5 min read Yes, I know. We’ve been waiting for the self-driving car revolution for what seems like forever. Google seemed on top of things in the years after 2009, when the company first started its self-driving car project. But now it’s 2017, and we still aren’t surrounded by fleets of autonomous vehicles. What gives?Related: Google, Automakers Object to California Rules for Self-Driving CarsWell, if recent developments are any indication, 2017 could be the year that self-driving cars finally start to go mainstream. And as a business owner, you need to be prepared for the ramifications of this quickly approaching massive technological and cultural shift.What entrepreneurs need to watch forSo, how might the emergence of autonomous vehicles affect your business?Consumer needs. For starters, consumers who have access to fully autonomous vehicles are going to have new needs that, as an entrepreneur, you’ll have to accommodate. Any products designed for drivers may have to be completely reimagined, and people will have more free time to fill if they’re able to move and focus on tasks during their hour (or longer) total commute time every day. Think ahead and prepare for that change.Cost of goods. Self-driving trucks will function more cheaply and efficiently than their manually driven counterparts, which means the cost and ease of transporting your goods are going to decrease. Prepare your logistics division to transition early and take advantage of these changes before your competitors do, so you can lower your prices accordingly.Space. With less need for roads and other transportation institutions, there’s going to be far more space for residential and business constructions. Depending on the nature of your business, this could be a major opportunity for expansion.Employee commutes. If you encourage your employees to opt for self-driving cars, or even have autonomous company cars that enable easy carpooling, your employees will suddenly have far more time every day to do their work. They’ll be simultaneously more productive and less stressed, which means your business stands to thrive.Related: Ford Doubling Silicon Valley Workforce in Push Toward Self-Driving CarsWhere we standSo, where exactly are we with self-driving cars? Is 2017 a realistic possibility?Google’s self-driving car project is now called Waymo, and is looking to partner with auto manufacturers to get a fleet of cars on the street shuttling consumers by 2020. We may start seeing early versions, or not yet-fully autonomous cars hitting the streets before then.Google isn’t the only company on the verge of a breakthrough, however. Self-driving taxi service nuTonomy is fully active in Singapore, though ride availability is limited, and there have been some complications already with the service. Uber isn’t far behind, with its goal to convert its fleet of drivers into a fleet of autonomous vehicles as soon as possible.Uber is now testing in multiple states, with those tests supervised by engineers, so it may be a little ambitious to expect its effort to expand nationwide in 2017. In any case, both companies stand to make significant progress this year, and are only a few rounds of testing away from the next stage.The big obstaclesSo far, there have been only a handful of collisions involving self-driving cars, most of which were the fault of a human driver, and only one of them was fatal. So, what’s stopping autonomous cars from rolling out?Snow and weather. Most self-driving car tests have been in California, Arizona, Florida and other areas with predictable, calm states of weather. In the American Northeast, where snow, hail and other complicated weather conditions are commonplace, autonomous cars still have many problems to solve. It’s much harder to make predictions and judgments about the environment there.Ethical dilemmas. Driving choices won’t always be black and white; for example, should an autonomous car kill its own driver if that action saves multiple other lives? Engineers have contemplated, but not come close to, solving these ethical dilemmas. In fact, they’re hypothetically unsolvable. What we really need to solve is how self-driving cars should approach these problems, should they come up.Legality. Legal concerns have always been a main stopping point for autonomous driving technology, but recently, companies like Uber have escalated the intensity. Uber has been involved in a vicious legal battle with the state of California since its autonomous test vehicles were caught running red lights, but the complexity of new laws poses a problem everywhere. Currently, even the testing of self-driving vehicles is legal only in California, Michigan, Florida, Nevada, Arizona, North Dakota, Tennessee and the District of Columbia.Certainty. No amount of PR in the world could salvage the reputation of a company whose self-driving cars cost innocent human lives. For tech companies, being 99.9 percent certain about the success of their software isn’t enough — they need to be as close to 100 percent as possible, and that means testing far beyond what any of us feel is “enough.”Related: Google Makes Progress on Self-Driving Cars as it Hits the 2 Million Mile MarkI think it’s a bit ambitious to say that 2017 will be the year self-driving cars take over, but it’s reasonable to expect massive progress throughout the year. If I had to put a date on it, I’d project that we’ll see self-driving cars transforming our economy by 2020, and that means you need to start thinking now about how your business is going to adapt.last_img read more