Exciting Finish To Deciding Matches

first_imgBy BEN HARRISQueensland’s Men’s 40’s player-coach Scott Notley thought his team did not stand a chance against New South Wales in the State of Origin series.Well, Notley was celebrating a series win after his group of Queenslanders won the deciding match 7-6.Down by one at half-time, Queensland scored four touchdowns to two in the second half to help them collect their first Men’s 40s series in a decade.“I was very proud of the boys’ effort,” Notley said. “The boys dug deep.“We lost the first one so the second game was do-or-die but we won it, and we had a bit of momentum.”It was Queensland’s fourth division win of the State of Origin series but New South Wales soon claimed their fifth division of 2012 with a nail-biting win in the Men’s 30s.After two intense matches, New South Wales and Queensland left nothing in the tank at the end of the third game.The match went touchdown-for-touchdown and they could not be separated at half-time.The second half saw both sides show their attacking skills and produced sensational touchdowns.Shannon Warren scored a double for New South Wales while his teammate Elijah Van Der Kwast scored five touchdowns in the deciding match.Queensland’s John Andrews bagged four but it wasn’t enough as New South Wales won the game 10-8 and the division 2-1.New South Wales made it a clean sweep in the Women’s 20s’ with a 6-3 victory in the third game. Emma Tonegato scoring two touchdowns for the Blues.Having wrapped up the Men’s 50s division, Queensland were looking at making it 3-0.However, New South Wales had something to say about that and came out firing in the opening stages.They took a 5-3 lead into half-time and marched on in the second half to win 8-4.In the Men’s 45’s, New South Wales claimed a 3-0 division win following their 6-2 victory in the third match.Graham Beale scoring two touchdowns in the final game.Only one touchdown separated Queensland and New South Wales in the first two matches of the Women’s 30s, but it was not the case in the dead-rubber.Having already won the series, Queensland came out and dominated New South Wales in the first half by scoring four touchdowns to one.They went on to win the match 6-3.Make sure you stay up to date with these websites for all the State of Origin action: State of Origin – www.soo.mytouchfooty.comTouch Football Australia – www.austouch.com.auTouch Football Australia’s YouTube channel – www.youtube.com/touchfootballausTwitter: www.twitter.com/touchfootyausFacebook: www.facebook.com/touchfootballaustralia Related LinksState of Origin game threelast_img read more

Video: Deion Sanders Addressed The Florida State Team Today

first_imgDeion Sanders walks into the Florida State team facility.NFL Hall of Famer and Florida State legend Deion Sanders was back at his alma mater today. While Sanders was there, he gave a speech to the current crop of Seminoles. The central message of Sanders’ talk was the expectations players should have for themselves. There’s also some footage of Sanders’ NFL Network interview with FSU defensive back Jalen Ramsey, a projected top-10 pick in next month’s draft. “What do you expect from yourself?”@DeionSanders spoke to the team before practice.https://t.co/tyPuqF4vsT— FSU Football (@FSU_Football) March 30, 2016The ‘Noles would be wise to listen to Sanders and heed his advice.last_img read more

What Is the Ionosphere And Who Is Steve

first_img Learn how GPS works with the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. Check out a slideshow of fantastic auroras from National Geographic. Who is Steve? Beyond auroras, the ionosphere also plays host to other impressive light shows. In 2016, citizen scientists spotted a particularly eye-catching phenomena, which scientists struggled to explain, Live Science sister-site Space.com previously reported. Bright rivers of white and pinkish light flowed over Canada, which is farther south than most auroras appear. Occasionally, dashes of green joined the mix. The mysterious lights were named Steve in homage to the animated movie “Over the Hedge” and were later rebranded as the “Strong Thermal Emission Velocity Enhancement” ⁠— still STEVE for short. “We’ve been studying the aurora for hundreds of years, and we couldn’t, and still can’t, explain what Steve is,” said Gareth Perry, a space weather scientist at the New Jersey Institute of Technology. “It’s interesting because its emissions and properties are unlike anything else we observe, at least with optics, in the ionosphere.” According to a 2019 study in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, the green streaks within STEVE may develop similarly to how traditional auroras form, as charged particles rain down upon the atmosphere. In STEVE, however, the river of light seems to glow when particles within the ionosphere collide and generate heat among themselves. Communication and navigation Though reactions in the ionosphere paint the sky with brilliant hues, they can also disrupt radio signals, interfere with navigational systems and sometimes cause widespread power blackouts. The ionosphere reflects radio transmissions below 10 megahertz, allowing the military, airlines and scientists to link radar and communication systems over long distances. These systems work best when the ionosphere is smooth, like a mirror, but they can be disrupted by irregularities in the plasma. GPS transmissions pass through the ionosphere and therefore bear the same vulnerabilities. “During large geomagnetic storms, or space weather events, currents [in the ionosphere] can induce other currents in the ground, electrical grids, pipelines, etc. and wreak havoc,” Perry said. One such solar storm caused the famous Quebec blackout of 1989. “Thirty years later, our electrical systems are still vulnerable to such events.” Scientists study the ionosphere using radars, cameras, satellite-bound instruments and computer models to better understand the region’s physical and chemical dynamics. Armed with this knowledge, they hope to better predict disruptions in the ionosphere and prevent problems that can cause on the ground below. Additional resources:by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeFood Research LabIf You Eat Grapes Every Day for 2 Months, This Can Happen To Your BodyFood Research LabUndoBrilliant Future10 Worst Paying College MajorsBrilliant FutureUndoDugiFeedThis Is What Will Happen When You Eat Bananas Every DayDugiFeedUndoiSEARCH10 Best Universities In The World 2019iSEARCHUndoScoops4YouNever Ever Put These 15 Foods in Your FridgeScoops4YouUndoMy Daily DiscoveryHow To Keep Your Photos And Videos SafeMy Daily DiscoveryUndo Light up the skies The scorching-hot surface of the sun expels streams of highly charged particles, and these streams are known as solar wind. According to NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, solar wind flies through space at about 25 miles (40 km) per second. Upon reaching the Earth’s magnetic field and the ionosphere below, solar winds set off a colorful chemical reaction in the night sky called an aurora. When solar winds whip across Earth, the planet stays shielded behind its magnetic field, also known as the magnetosphere. Generated by churning molten iron in the Earth’s core, the magnetosphere sends solar radiation racing toward either pole. There, the charged particles collide with chemicals swirling in the ionosphere, generating the spellbinding auroras. Scientists have found that the sun’s own magnetic field squishes the Earth’s weaker one, shifting auroras toward the night side of the planet, as reported by Popular Mechanics. Near the Arctic and Antarctic circles, auroras streak across the sky every night, according to National Geographic. The colorful curtains of light, known as the aurora borealis and aurora australis, respectively, hang about 620 miles (1,000 km) above the Earth’s surface. The auroras glow green-yellow when ions strike oxygen particles in the lower ionosphere. Reddish light often blooms along the auroras’ edges, and purples and blues also appear in the nighttime sky, though this happens rarely. “The cause of aurora is somewhat known, but it is not entirely resolved,” said Toshi Nishimura, a geophysicist at Boston University. “For example, what causes a particular type of color of aurora, such as purple, is still a mystery.” Aurora Phenomena Named STEVE Explained by NASAVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Better Bug Sprays?01:33关闭选项Automated Captions – en-US facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65947-ionosphere.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0002:1202:12Your Recommended Playlist01:33Better Bug Sprays?04:24Sperm Whale Befriends Underwater Robot01:08Why Do French Fries Taste So Bad When They’re Cold?00:29Robot Jumps Like a Grasshopper, Rolls Like a Ball02:31Surgical Robotics00:29Video – Giggly Robot关闭  A dense layer of molecules and electrically charged particles, called the ionosphere, hangs in the Earth’s upper atmosphere starting at about 35 miles (60 kilometers) above the planet’s surface and stretching out beyond 620 miles (1,000 km). Solar radiation coming from above buffets particles suspended in the atmospheric layer. Radio signals from below bounce off the ionosphere back to instruments on the ground. Where the ionosphere overlaps with magnetic fields, the sky erupts in brilliant light displays that are incredible to behold. Where is the ionosphere? Several distinct layers make up Earth’s atmosphere, including the mesosphere, which starts 31 miles (50 km) up, and the thermosphere, which starts at 53 miles (85 km) up. The ionosphere consists of three sections within the mesosphere and thermosphere, labeled the D, E and F layers, according to the UCAR Center for Science Education. Extreme ultraviolet radiation and X-rays from the sun bombard these upper regions of the atmosphere, striking the atoms and molecules held within those layers. The powerful radiation dislodges negatively charged electrons from the particles, altering those particles’ electrical charge. The resulting cloud of free electrons and charged particles, called ions, led to the name “ionosphere.” The ionized gas, or plasma, mixes with the denser, neutral atmosphere.Advertisement The concentration of ions in the ionosphere varies with the amount of solar radiation bearing down on the Earth. The ionosphere grows dense with charged particles during the day, but that density subsides at night as charged particles recombine with displaced electrons. Entire layers of the ionosphere appear and disappear during this daily cycle, according to NASA. Solar radiation also fluctuates over an 11-year period, meaning the sun may put out more or less radiation depending on the year. Explosive solar flares and gusts of solar wind stir up sudden changes in the ionosphere, teaming up with high-altitude winds and severe weather systems brewing on the Earth below. Earth’s ionosphere, a region of charged particles, stretches up to the border between Earth and space. Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Duberstein This amateur astronomer’s photograph, taken on May 8, 2016, in Keller, Washington, was used in the new research about the celestial phenomenon called STEVE. The major structures are two bands of upper atmospheric emissions located 100 miles (160 kilometers) above the ground: a reddish arc and a green picket fence. Credit: Rocky Raybell Watch an animation of the Earth’s magnetic field in action, from Nova and the Khan Academy.last_img read more

SC quashes certain provisions of 2016 Maharashtra law on dance bars

first_imgMaharashtra SHARE SHARE EMAIL January 17, 2019 It quashed the provision mandating dance bars to be 1 km away from religious places and educational institutions The Supreme Court on Thursday set aside certain provisions of a law imposing restrictions on the licensing and functioning of dance bars in Maharashtra.A bench headed by Justice A K Sikri quashed certain provisions of the Maharashtra Prohibition of Obscene Dance in Hotels, Restaurants and Bar Rooms and Protection of Dignity of Women (Working therein) Act, 2016. These include the mandatory installation of CCTVs and a partition between bar rooms and the dance floor.The top court, however, upheld some provisions. It allowed the payment of tips to performers but made it clear that showering of currency notes cannot be allowed.It quashed the provision mandating that dance bars in Maharashtra should be one kilometre away from religious places and educational institutions.It also upheld the condition fixing the timing of dance bars in the state from 6 pm to 11.30 pm. FROM THE VIEWSROOMShake a leg COMMENT SHAREcenter_img Published on RELATED dance Representative image COMMENTSlast_img read more