Minister promises Grand Turk fire unit next budget year

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:#GrandTurkfireunit, #GTresidentsputoutfire, #magneticmedianews Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppTurks and Caicos, July 19, 2017 – Grand Turk – Residents of Grand Turk were praised highly for their community effort, which along with the airport’s fire truck eventually saw a house blaze extinguished last Thursday.   The residents had to ban together to contain a fire without the help of proper fire-fighting equipment because the fire was threatening a second home.The airport’s fire crew was unable to leave the JAGS McCartney international Airport because flights were on the ground; there is no domestic fire service in Grand Turk.   The first home was gutted by the flames and it again raises the issue that despite huge financial overflows, the Turks and Caicos Islands Government continues to not invest in a domestic fire unit for the Capital of the country.Grand Turk is also where thousands of tourists visit via cruise ship on any given day and is home to the seat of Government, including Parliament and the Governor’s residence, Waterloo.    Still, Home Affairs Minister, Delroy Williams expressed in a media statement sadness at the loss for the Missick family and explained again, that the domestic fire unit will not come until the next fiscal year.“My Government is deeply concerned about the frequency at which fires are occurring and have committed to ensuring that resources are available to provide domestic fire services on the island of Grand Turk during the next budget cycle.”There have been three fires so far this year in Grand Turk, including the complete loss of over 200 year old Victoria Public Library.  The cause of the Misick house fire is unknown, the Fire Department and Police Force are investigating.#MagneticMediaNews#GrandTurkfireunit#GTresidentsputoutfirelast_img read more

A Web Traffic and Engagement Tip Sheet

first_imgEveryone needs a review sometimes. And in the highly competitive and, especially for magazine publishers, make-or-break world of Web content publishing, SEO and engagement are two critical strategies that deserve perpetual oversight and review. So, in that spirit, we’ve spoken with a number of SEO and Web content development experts across the industry and compiled their favorite ways to drive—and keep—traffic to their sites. Optimization and TrafficTopic Pages Are the AnchorsWe’re all creating hundreds of thousands of pages of content that come and go on a daily basis. Topic pages that never change their URLs, however, are like a traffic magnet. Over time, other sites will link to them, building up that all-important “Google juice,” and topic pages tend to be very keyword heavy. “If something has been up over time, you build up more incoming links,” says Kelly Maloni, director of product development at New York. “Google is looking for incoming links, keyword-friendly URLs, and keyword-rich pages. Pages that have those and don’t change over and over again have a lot of weight. It’s about owning the keywords, a simple URL, and owning that space.” Remember Your 301 RedirectsEvery site needs to rebuild its structure at some time or another. If you do have to change a URL to a topic page or a directory page, make sure you alert the search engines with a 301 Redirect command, which tells search engines that the old URL is the same as the new one. “We’re pretty obsessive about the 301 Redirects,” says Maloni, who warns that without it, Google will treat the URL as a brand new one and all the elements built up over time that gave the page a high ranking will be erased. SEO for that section will have to start all over again. “Instead, a 301 Redirect tells Google that the old URL is now the new one, and to consider them the same page and keep the page rank.” Social Media Isn’t Just a Buzz Phrase“It can actually work from a traffic standpoint,” says Jonathon Hills, acting GM of ReadersDigest.com. “We’ve done a lot to ramp up our social media efforts, which now account for a good portion of our traffic.” Digg, StumbleUpon, Facebook, Twitter—they’re all being used, but not indiscriminately. “Social media is a fuzzy area, but if you select the channels carefully and position the content in a way that makes sense to your brand, it can be a powerful traffic driver,” says Hills.Leverage Your Analytics“A lot of my work comes from looking at analytics,” says Alison McPartland, manager of search and discovery strategies at Questex Media. McPartland created a “Top Author” report that identifies which editors and what content brings in the most traffic—and uses it to foster a bit of friendly competition. “It’s the top 30 articles of content per month,” says McPartland. “We pull who the author is and what the topic is and analyze page views, percentage over site, total amount of keywords that were driven to that story, average time spent, bounce rate and exit rate.”The content analytics reveal how visitors find the content (keywords) and what topics are trending high. McPartland then makes sure to share the details with the editors. “It gets them competitive with each other and makes them proactive, rather than waiting to see what works.”Leveraging Syndication’s ResultsFinding other Web sites and portals to syndicate your content is another way of driving traffic back to your site, but it’s what you do with the traffic that’s also important. “We’ve got great partnerships with MSN, Yahoo!, AOL and some smaller sites as well,” says Sean Nolan, Rodale’s VP of online operations. “We assume we’re getting new audiences and populate the article with downstream links. We try to get them around the rest of the site and show them related content—maybe have a subscription or product offer.” The E-mail Newsletter ConnectionCreate and send e-mail newsletters as often as people give you permission to. “It really begins with e-mail,” says Jason Revzon, VP of Taunton Interactive at Taunton Press. “Half of our traffic comes from search, but e-mail is hugely important. It’s your way of reminding people what’s on your site. Depending on the site, we double or quadruple our traffic when the e-mails go out.”Content and EngagementTease Related Content“You want to watch for people viewing multiple pages of content across the board,” says Omid Jahanbin, director of product design and creative strategies, interactive platforms, at Cygnus Business Media. “We want to keep on average four pages of content on the top of our page view line.”Time the Release of Certain ContentPost content when your audience is most likely to read it. “You want to release content when you have a high traffic period,” says Jahanbin. “Typically, 11:00 am is very high for our publishing partners.”The added benefit here, says Jahanbin, is readers are more likely to avail themselves of the sharing functions, too—e-mail to a friend and the social networking buttons. “There’s a reason corporations release news they don’t like on a Friday. It’s lost its mystique by Monday.”Content Packaging and Presentation Don’t just shovel a 2,000-word story into a single Web page. Break it up. Add infographics. Consider changing the format completely. “We’re always trying to turn a full-length magazine article into a seven-photo slide show, for example,” says Hills. “We could take that and break it down and extract pieces and add some relevant images and create a whole new story—that presentation works better than a 1,000-word article. Or we could turn 25 tips into a one-minute Web-exclusive video clip.”Reformat Your Video PresentationConsider breaking up a longer-form video subject into a number of shorter clips that can play in a series. Taunton’s Revzon has introduced “snack-sized” videos that visitors are watching all at once. “We recently went from a single-clip player on a page to a player that has eight clips on a subject that play in order,” he says. “People are watching eight videos on average, and that keeps them there a long time. They’re small nuggets—between 40 seconds and two minutes—but they’re put together in a way that lets you lean back and enjoy them.”Make Your Slideshows Tell a StoryA perennial page-view favorite, it can actually be hard for image-only slideshows to keep readers until the end. At UBM’s Channelweb.com, vice president and editor Larry Hooper says they get 80 percent pull-through on their slideshows by adding some editorial content. “We treat them like stories, not like a bunch of pictures with captions,” he says. “We take a graphic novel approach to pull people through.”Hooper also says that he’ll substitute a slideshow or other visuals for a text-based story where it makes sense. A story about 10 new laptops, for example, could easily be turned into a slideshow. Pull Your Visitors into Guiding Editorial DevelopmentUser-generated content is one thing, but having your site’s most loyal visitors help guide story development accomplishes two things: Your editors have first-hand knowledge of what topics matter most, and your users are pulled deeper into the site experience. “Instead of calling up five or 10 readers, we’re starting the reporting within our community,” says Hooper. “It creates more traction than just commenting. Our reporters have set up private groups and invite experts to join, and those are generating stories on the site.”last_img read more

Jessore journos throat slashed

first_imgA journalist sustained severe injuries as a group of miscreants slashed his throat in Jessore’s Sadar upazila on Thursday, reports UNB.The victim is Ananda Das, 55, the assignment editor of local daily ‘The Dainik Protidiner Kotha’. Son of Shibpada Das, he was residing at Shashthitala of the district town.Quoting the victim, officer-in-charge of Kotwali police station AKM Azmal Huda said three unidentified young men took him to Chanchra Harinar Beel from terminal area in the afternoon. However, he could not recall what had happened later.On the other hand, Anup Basu, a relative of Ananda, said he came to know around 6:00pm that miscreants left the journalist in the Chanchra Harinar Beel area.Later, he with the help of locals rescued Ananda and took him to the Jessore 250-bed General Hospital.Farazi Ahmed Sayeed Bulbul, acting editor of the local daily, said a group of hoodlums tried to kill Ananda.However, it was still not clear why the miscreants carried out the attack on the journalist, said Bulbul.last_img read more

From Felon to PhD

first_imgStanley Andrisse is a 33-year-old provost post-doctoral fellow at Johns Hopkins, possessing both his MBA and PhD and participating in research about Diabetes, a disease that plagues millions, Andrisse is what most Americans would call extremely successful, and he is also an ex-felon.Andrisse was born in Ferguson, Missouri and first took an interest in the medical field while in prison.Stanley Andrisse. (Courtesy photo)“While I was away my father’s health started to plummet and his condition worsened pretty quickly…while I was still in prison I’d get information through phone calls and letters and pictures of how they were amputating his legs piece by piece, up to his torso, due to complications from diabetes. That was the driving motivation behind me wanting to learn more about diabetes, the effect that it had on my dad,” said Andrisse. “While I was away I dove pretty deep into wanting to learn more and I was fortunate enough to have a professor who I met before I went away, who sent me research on the topic…while I was away I was already gaining a passion and an understanding.”After serving his time due to drug related charges Andrisse went on to receive his PhD and MBA, however, the road was not easy.“I’ve been denied from a number of jobs whether it was just coaching or a department store job,” said Andrisse. “I had been rejected from several PhD programs possibly due to the question…I finished my PhD in four years (a program that usually takes 6 years to complete) and I finished at the top of my class and I was getting my MBA in the process, I’m pretty sure I was qualified to get in those other programs but they chose not to let me in, I could only get into a program where I had a professor vouching for me.”The question Andrisse is referring to is the check-off box for felony convictions. Majority of the states within the US require this question to be answered on both job and college applications. This limits the employment and educational opportunities available for ex-offenders.Although Andrisse has faced discrimination and bias due to his conviction, it doesn’t stop him from telling his story.“I enjoy being able to help others and it’s also therapeutic… On a day to day basis I hear so many biases and what people think of criminals and for the most part nobody knows my background so I have to just suck it up. Things come up and you have to suck it up as a convicted felon because no one really knows for the most part at your job because it may affect your being there so you kind of just don’t talk about it,” said Andrisse. “There’s a psychological part that affects you aside from the obvious things, I can’t vote, I can’t own a firearm, I have all these barriers against employment and education, there are psychological and structural barriers to deal with.”Andrisse is currently working with the Ban the Box organization which is an international campaign geared towards helping ex-offenders with job placement and persuading corporations and employers to remove the check box inquiring about whether applicants have a criminal record. One of the reasons Andrisse chose to pursue a fellowship at Johns Hopkins was their leniency towards ex-convicts.“I did a biomedical PhD and I strategically chose to do that coming out of prison because it not only gave me my education coming out of prison but they also paid me to do research. I got out of prison and was able to get a job and my education through having my PhD. When it was coming to an end I was a little nervous as to what I was going to do. I had tried to get some other employment and I had been denied so then when I was trying to get a job pertaining to my PhD I was a little worried about whether I was going to be able to do that.” I searched for jobs and universities that are lenient towards ex-offenders and Hopkins is actually the leading employer of returning citizens in the state of Maryland.”The term “returning citizen” is used often in political circuits to describe ex-offenders but Andrisse believes it is rather ill-fitting.“I don’t like using (returning citizen). I chuckle but I stop you know because I don’t think we are returning citizens because we don’t have certain rights, we’re looked at as convicts, we’re looked at as criminals and we’ll continue to be looked at in that way until that stigma is broken…I think returning citizens are not what we currently are I think it would be nice to eventually be at that stage but I think right now society still sees us as ex-convicts”Andrisse is currently involved with several organizations seeking to advocate for prison reform and the less discrimination against ex-offenders, although the road has not been easy he remains hopeful.“I have hope that sharing my story will have people talking about it and bring more attention to it…I think it’s good for people to see that these people, us, me, we’re just regular people. I’m just a person that has dreams and aspirations and I’m just trying to meet those.”last_img read more