DONEGAL FAMILY GOES CHRISTMAS JUMPER CRACKERS!

first_imgDONEGAL has gone Christmas jumper crackers this year.It seems as if everyone in the county has managed to get their hands on wacky festive pullover.And Carole McGloughlin had no choice but to join in with the Speer family in Carrigart! Pictured are Lisa, Adam, Craig, Alexis, Andrew, Andrew and Carole. DONEGAL FAMILY GOES CHRISTMAS JUMPER CRACKERS! was last modified: December 25th, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:DONEGAL FAMILY GOES CHRISTMAS JUMPER CRACKERS!last_img read more

Livestock diseases a global threat worth monitoring

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Don “Doc” SandersThis month’s column is more serious than most. If you’re looking for entertainment and my usual wild stories, you may want to skip this one. But this column is a must-read, if you raise livestock and/or care about the American food supply (and if you’re like me, you like to eat). Livestock disease outbreaks are occurring every day somewhere in the world. These diseases, if not contained, could threaten our food supply and lifestyle in a way that most Americans are too naïve to fathom.It will pay you to be aware of this situation, so you can be prepared. For starters, here are a few facts that escape most Americans.Many diseases are zoonotic. This means they can spread from animals to humans, or vice versa.An example is avian influenza, which can pass from birds to humans. Remember the avian flu outbreak a couple years ago? More than five million turkeys and chickens had to be euthanized when the flu virus swept through flocks throughout the U.S.Other animal diseases do not spread to humans. But they can cause huge economic losses to farmers and the entire food supply chain, from transportation to processing, to institutional food programs, to retail grocery stores and restaurants.You may remember when in 2013 PED (Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea) killed more than seven million baby pigs in the U.S. — not counting millions more in other countries such as China. Now you know why the price of bacon rose.It was discovered that virus-carrying swine feed ingredients from China caused this PED outbreak. Feed has been suspected of carrying diseases around the world for years, but this was a first when it was proven.You may think I’m raising alarm over old news. But several potential disease outbreaks are on the horizon, deeply concerning U.S. health authorities. These include African Swine Fever (ASF), Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) and a new Avian Influenza outbreak. Several diseases could directly threaten Americans, while some have popped up in countries where American companies do business.African Swine Fever is a disease that’s new to American interests. It has cropped up in China with over 16 outbreaks reported recently. Apparently, it was transported from Russia across the border to a pig farm in northern Heilongjiang province. Nobody can explain how it happened — at least no one who will admit to knowing anything about it.The Chinese pig farmer recognized he had sick hogs, so he loaded them on a truck and transported them to the closest packing plant, 1,100 miles south. Talk about a recipe for spreading the disease! When he arrived at the packing plant most of the pigs were dead. No one has said if the pigs were disposed of or processed. It’s anyone’s guess.Since that time, 15 more ASF outbreaks have occurred in China. These outbreaks seemed unrelated, as they popped up in many locations. American veterinary scientists have volunteered to assist the Chinese government with control of the epidemic. I was involved with making contacts, but Chinese authorities declined our assistance and have remained tight-lipped since the earliest reports of the disease outbreak.Even though American officials are concerned about ASF, they have deeper worries. They are on edge about FMD — not if FMD will occur in the U.S. but when it will occur!Foot and Mouth Disease (not to be confused with Foot in Mouth Disease, with which I’m afflicted) was eradicated from the U.S. in 1929. Now FMD is persistent in several South American countries, Europe and many Third World countries that don’t have the resources to establish disease containment or eradication plans. Such plans inconvenience American tourists, but such measures can prevent disease from crossing borders.The threat of FMD will affect more than farmers. Every American citizen will feel the inconvenience of efforts to control the disease. Humans aren’t susceptible to either of these diseases but can carry either of them on their clothes or in illicit food products purchased in a country with these viruses.Ten-mile zones around disease outbreaks will be quarantined. Police, sheriff’s deputies and National Guard will be mobilized to ensure the integrity of the quarantine zones.Dairy farms will be especially encumbered by the restrictions, because milk must be picked up every day. Milk trucks will have to be disinfected upon entering the zone to pick up a dairy farm’s milk and disinfected once again when leaving the farm with the milk.What makes this especially difficult for dairy farms is that they will need to plan for a “clean” zone equipped with disinfection equipment for milk pickup. The other option is to construct a neutral zone where trucks can load without entering the dairy farm.Most dairy farms today are struggling to survive. Because of the depth of their economic woes, very few dairymen have developed a plan in the event of a quarantine. Without a plan, they could have to wait days, or perhaps weeks, before they could market their milk. Since dairies harvest milk every day, a dairyman will be put in the situation of having to dump his cows’ milk until he has developed a USDA-approved written plan and acquired disinfecting equipment.Because of their economic circumstances, some dairymen will not be inclined to make the extra effort that a quarantine will require. They will be more inclined to sell their herds. I understand their emotions, as being a dairyman is extremely difficult these days.Selling their herds won’t be easy either, because it could take weeks for the dairymen to get a permit to move the cows off the farm. Without a USDA-approved quarantine plan, these dairymen will be in limbo.My advice to all livestock owners is to discuss and plan a course of action with a veterinarian who is familiar with requirements, so they can continue operating in the wake of a catastrophic disease such as FMD. But most veterinarians aren’t yet up to speed on the requirements.The 2013 PED outbreak in baby pigs is just a mini version of what could happen in a major disease outbreak. PED killed baby pigs only. Even then, swine operations had pickup truck loads of carcasses to dispose of.Contingency plans are needed for disposal of animal carcasses in the event of widespread animal deaths or mass euthanasia. Suffice it to say, officials with Homeland Security and the USDA have been researching plans for wholesale disposal of livestock by burial, composting, cremation and alkali digestors.Which brings to mind the Louisiana official I met at a meeting in Amarillo on animal carcass disposal methods during an epidemic disease outbreak (yes, I live a glamorous life). He told me that in the Pelican state they have their own 100% efficient disposal method. With a slow drawl he explained, “We drag the carcasses down to the river bank and let the alligators clean them up. We just need a knife to let the air out of them before the alligators will touch them.”last_img read more

High-class shopping in the middle of nowhere. — Prada, y’all! (GC1W1KC) — Geocache of the Week

first_imgPrada, Marfa. Photo by geocacher wininiGeocache Name:Prada, y’all! (GC1W1KC)Difficulty/Terrain Rating:2/1.5Why this is the Geocache of the Week:Rodeo Drive, Fifth Avenue…middle-of-nowhere, Texas? If you’re trying to figure out what these places all have in common, it’s something you would probably never expect: Prada. Yes, the luxury clothing brand you can see fancy people around the world wearing. There’s one thing different about this Prada store, though: it’s never open and it only has right-footed shoes. Just outside of Marfa, Texas, artists Elmgreen and Dragset collaborated with multiple people, including Miuccia Prada herself, to create this piece of installation art. While the shoes and handbags in the store are pretty, we think the smiley you earn for finding the nearby geocache is way cooler.# of Finds:109# of Favorite Points:30What the geocache creators, The Stray Gatts, to say:“We had just visited Marfa and were continuing west when we ran across this amazing, surreal place in the middle of the desert. We were stunned that there was not already a geocache there so we just snuck one in. We had no idea that it would become as popular as it is, but in retrospect it is such an unusual site that it makes sense. We’re honored by the positive reviews and favorites, but we are most happy that we have been able to help a few other people discover it. I’d love to give a huge shout out to the amazing geocache community: “Hey Geo-Brothers and Sisters… CACHE ON!!”What geocachers are saying:“This was my favorite cache of the whole trip. I love Prada and I love Marfa (it was my first visit) with it’s great stories, food and cute hotels. What a great idea, to put a cache here. I am sure we would have missed this if there was not a cache.” – Mrs_HiDude“We just had to check this one out! Never would have believed this. Just another reason to get out and geocache. Thanks for putting a cache here.”  – DaveandDeb“This was the highlight of the whole trip. The wife loved it! Found the cache quickly, then hung around to snap a few photos. What a riot! TFTC!” – HoustonControlRead More LogsPhotos:When we said in the middle of nowhere, we weren’t joking. Photo by geocacher HoustonControlTwo happy cachers scoping out some fashions and earning a smiley. Photo by geocacher TX1096Those shoes and handbags are SO 2005. Photo by geocacher thenkengreneSee More Photos SharePrint RelatedMingo — Geocache of the WeekMarch 29, 2017In “Community”This one is a shoe-in. — Tree of Soles (GC27XEW) — Geocache of the WeekFebruary 26, 2014In “Community”Privy (GC2Z6GB) — Geocache of the WeekOctober 1, 2015In “Geocache of the Week” What’s the most interesting place you never would’ve seen if it hadn’t been for a geocache? Post the story and the photos in the comments.Continue to explore some of the most engaging geocaches around the globe. Check out all the Geocaches of the Week on the Geocaching blog.If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, leave a comment below with the name of the geocache, the GC code, and why you think we should feature it.Share with your Friends:Morelast_img read more

The Worst: Ohio State’s Wireless Is Preventing Buckeye QB Stephen Collier From Watching “House Of Cards”

first_imgStephen Collier can't watch House of Cards because of Ohio State's wireless signal.Today is a great day. It’s Friday, but, more importantly, Season 3 of House of Cards has been released. Millions of people across the country will be visiting Netflix to watch Frank Underwood wreak havoc in Washington, D.C. Ohio State redshirt freshman quarterback Stephen Collier wants to be one of those people watching the show. But he can’t – the spotty wireless on OSU’s Columbus campus isn’t letting him access the online media platform. We feel for you, Stephen. Finally get a break to go watch House of Cards in between class in then Osuwireless does Osuwireless things pic.twitter.com/u479rsHAsJ— Stephen Collier (@S13Collier) February 27, 2015Ohio State wireless: step your game up. There’s TV shows to be binging.last_img read more

TMC workers hurt in highway accident

first_imgKolkata: At least 30 Trinamool supporters and workers suffered injuries after the bus they were travelling in plunged into a water body near Siliguri-Jalpaiguri State Highway on Sunday. The injured party workers have been admitted to hospital for treatment.The Trinamool workers were planning to take part in an election campaign meeting by Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee in Jalpaiguri. They had hired the bus to reach the venue of the election campaign meeting. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari PujaAccording to local residents, on Sunday, Banerjee was scheduled to address an election campaign meeting at Churabhadar in Moynaguri from 1:30 pm. To attend the meeting, around 45 TMC supporters and workers had hired the bus from Sariam. They had started their journey in the morning to reach Churabhandar. However, after a few kilometres near Talma, the bus had a tyre burst and the driver lost his control over the steering and the vehicle plunged into a water body beside the Siliguri-Jalpaiguri State Highway. Also Read – Bengal civic volunteer dies in road mishap on national highwayLocal resident ran to help the accident victims. Meanwhile, Rajgunj police station and local Trinamool leaders were informed about the accident. Police officers reached the spot shortly and rescued the injured persons. Almost all the passengers had suffered injuries but about 30 of them had suffered serious injuries. The injured persons have been rushed to Rajgunj Rural Hospital Belakoba Rural Hospital and Jalpaiguri Super Specialty Hospital. A few of them were discharged after providing necessary treatment and many are still undergoing treatment.last_img read more

King Mohammed VI Flies To Mali

first_imgRabat – King Mohammed VI left this afternoon Morocco, heading to Bamako for an official visit to Mali, first leg of an African trip that will take the Sovereign to Cote D’Ivoire, Guinea-Conakry and Gabon.The royal delegation includes the Sovereign’s advisors Taib Fassi Fihri and Fouad Ali El Himma, as well as the Minister of Foreign Affairs and Aooperation, Salaheddine Mezouar, Minister of Habous and Islamic Affairs, Ahmed Toufiq, Economy and Finance Minister, Mohamed Boussaid, Agriculture and Fisheries Minister, Aziz Akhannouch, Equipement, Transport and Logistics Minister, Aziz Rebbah, Industry, Trade, Investment and Numeric Economy Minister, Moulay Hafid Elalamy, Health Minister, El Houceine El Ouardi, Energy, Mining, Water and Environment Minister, Abdelkader Amara, Tourism Minister, Lahcen Haddad and Youssef Amrani, chargé de mission at the Royal office.A business and economic executive delegation and other civil and military figures are also part of the Sovereign’s delegation.last_img read more

Gallery OSU vs Indiana

OSU junior tight end Marcus Baugh (85) is forced out of bounds during the first half against Indiana on Oct. 8. The Buckeyes won 38-17. Credit: Alexa Mavrogianis | Photo Editor The Ohio State Buckeyes took on the Indiana Hoosiers on Oct. 8 at Ohio Stadium. The Buckeyes came away with a 38-17 victory.

Ohio fans accustomed to disappointment mediocrity

I grew up watching great high school football in Cleveland: St. Ignatius, St. Edward, Glenville, and even the big Cincinnati schools like St. Xavier and Elder. All these teams were excellent, but I was an Edward’s girl through and through. I love seeing players that I watched in high school play first for top-notch college teams and occasionally the NFL. I knew the kind of talent drinking Lake Erie water can get you. But, when St. Ed’s started to decline after my senior year, I wasn’t surprised. Why? Because I’m an Ohio fan.Being an Ohio fan means getting used to disappointment. As a Clevelander, I’ve had teams that were this close to making history. The Cavs’ trip to the semifinals last season or the Indians’ bids for the World Series in the mid ‘90s were the most poignant disappointments in my memory. Though I was heartbroken when these teams inevitably lost, I was secretly expecting to be disappointed. Why? Because I’m an Ohio fan — and every year is a rebuilding year for us. There is always a “next year” for the Ohio fan.This “next year” attitude encourages mediocrity in both the fans and the players. Look at our own Ohio State football team, it seems to me that they only play as well as their opponent. Against the University of Spoiled Children, our Buckeyes truly rose to the occasion, and almost won, too. But against teams like Toledo and Illinois I felt like we held back, even though our starters stayed in for most of the game. The Bucks don’t play every game like it’s the big game; if they did, it would lead us to winning seasons, to national championships and could even elevate Tressel to the hallowed level of Woody Hayes.Mediocrity is not limited to the Buckeyes, but is an epidemic in the NFL, too. Look at the Browns vs. Bengals game this weekend. Aside from some excellent running by Josh Cribbs and some good interceptions and throws by Cinci, it was a choke-off. It almost ended in a tie for crying out loud — a tie in professional football! Did you know that could happen? I didn’t, and neither did some of the players. If the Bengals’ kicker had missed the field goal, it would have happened. The two pro-football teams in Ohio would have tied each other in yet another demonstration of our state’s mediocrity.Yes, I’m bashing Ohio teams with all the rage of a scorned lover. That’s the key word, though: lover. I will never stop rooting for my Browns, my Indians, my Cavaliers and most of all my Buckeyes, even when I inevitably leave Ohio. I want them to be amazing, to startle the pundits who talk endlessly about Tim Tebow and Brett Favre (who really aren’t that good. Just saying). I want us to win national championships and Super Bowls. Heck,I’d just like for us to have good seasons. I’m a true Ohio fan, in good times and bad, but I’d like an end to year after year of bad and a lot more good. read more

Five questions to ask about Ohio State – Minnesota

1. What is the state of the Minnesota football program? It’s rare for college football coaches to be fired mid-season. But Minnesota bucked that trend earlier this month. On Oct. 17, Minnesota fired coach Tim Brewster after the Golden Gophers’ 1-6 start. In a little more than three-and-a-half seasons as coach, Brewster went 15-30, including 6-21 in the Big Ten. Offensive coordinator Jeff Horton is now interim head coach. 2. Does Adam Weber pose problems for a banged-up Buckeye secondary? Last week, Weber joined the company of former Big Ten greats in the 10,000 career-passing-yards club. In recent weeks, the Golden Gophers have been throwing the ball extensively. Weber has averaged 47 passing attempts in the last two games. In three career games against Ohio State, Weber has averaged 177 passing yards a game while throwing two touchdowns and four interceptions. Despite those average numbers, OSU coach Jim Tressel holds Weber in high regard. “We had him in youth camp. I thought he was outstanding then, and 10,000 yards later I think he’s still outstanding,” Tressel said. “He’s a competitor.” 3. Has Ross Homan’s injury opened the door for the next star Buckeye linebacker? Remember back in 2005 when senior standout linebacker Bobby Carpenter broke his leg against Michigan and true freshman James Laurinaitis stepped in for him and didn’t miss a beat? Andrew Sweat is delivering a repeat performance in 2010 while Ross Homan is mending a foot injury. In the last two games, Sweat had 16 tackles, two tackles for loss, an interception, a forced fumble and a pass break-up. 4. Is Terrelle Pryor out of the Heisman race? The smart money says that with Auburn’s Cam Newton and Oregon’s LaMichael James putting up impressive numbers week after week, along with Boise State’s Kellen Moore’s sustained excellence throughout the season, Pryor’s Heisman campaign might be postponed until 2011. Although he’s not completely out of the race yet (Pryor ranks in the top 12 in the nation in touchdown passes and quarterback rating), he will need monster efforts in each of the final four regular season games to put himself back into the discussion. 5. After struggling at Illinois and losing at Wisconsin, will OSU’s road struggles continue against Minnesota? The Golden Gophers are hardly intimidating at 1-7 overall and 0-4 in the Big Ten. They are 7-42 in program history against OSU, their worst record against any Big Ten opponent. But consider this: No current Buckeye has played at TCF Bank Stadium, which opened Sept. 12, 2009. OSU always gets every Big Ten opponent’s best shot and the Golden Gophers will be amped to play under the lights Saturday night. Tressel said he hasn’t been disappointed by his team’s play on the road so far, but agreed that his squad’s two previous performances away from Ohio Stadium have left room for improvement. “I haven’t looked at our two trips and said, ‘I don’t think they were focused’ or ‘I don’t think they understood’ or ‘they let the crowd get to them,’” Tressel said. “But do we need to play better on the road? Absolutely.” read more

Ohio State baseball looking to establish itself as one of Big Tens

Junior outfielder Pat Porter (3) slides into home during a game against Toledo April 3 at Bill Davis Stadium. OSU won, 7-2.Credit: Elliot Schall / Lantern photographerIf the Ohio State baseball team wants to be considered as one of the best teams in the Big Ten, making a statement in its first conference road series will go a long way.After getting swept in a three-game series at home by Indiana last weekend, the Buckeyes (18-10, 2-3) have a season-defining series this weekend at Nebraska (16-13, 1-2). OSU cruised in two midweek games against Ohio and Toledo that resulted in 31 hits for the Buckeyes, and coach Greg Beals said after feeling the pressure last weekend, the team has to step up against another one of the Big Ten’s top teams.“They were picked to be second in our conference preseason, so we’ve got to go defend ourselves. We didn’t have a good conference weekend last weekend and we can’t afford to have two bad weekends in a row in conference,” Beals said.Junior catcher Connor Sabanosh said the team realizes how important this weekend is if it wants to make a run at winning the Big Ten.“It’s going to be a big series for us after the tough three losses against Indiana,” Sabanosh said. “We’re really looking forward to our hitting to continue, these last two games have been big for us pounding out some hits and some runs. So we’re looking forward to keep it going through the weekend.”Pitching is key for OSU — the team is 13-0 when leading after seven innings and 17-2 when limiting opponents to five runs. Freshman pitcher Zach Farmer said heading into another Big Ten series, the pitchers have to build on the momentum they gained this week.“We’re on a roll right now and we just have to keep it going,” Farmer said.Against Indiana, pitchers were trying too hard and not sticking to the game plan, Sabanosh said.“Last weekend I thought they left a few too many balls over the middle of the plate. We have our best success working down on the corners,” Sabanosh said. “I think if they can stick with their game plan working down on the zone, we’ll be pretty effective out there.”In his first year at OSU after playing two years at a junior college, Sabanosh said he is excited to see what the Big Ten games look like on the road.“I’m hoping for a big one. It’s been fun on the road,” Sabanosh said. “We’ve been fortunate. The Oregon series was a lot of fun, great energy in the crowd. I’m really looking forward to the Nebraska series and I’m expecting a big crowd.”Beals said he expects the series to be exciting.“It’s a very good college baseball atmosphere there,” Beals said. “We’re going to have a good challenge here. We’re going on the road to play a good team.”First pitch in Lincoln is scheduled for 7:35 p.m. Friday. read more